Viable Amaryllis Seeds

viable Amaryllis seeds(viable Amaryllis seeds)
After you've succesfully pollinated your Amaryllis-Hippeastrum flower and you've waited patiently for the seed pods to ripen and open the next step is collecting the seeds. The Amaryllis Hippeastrum seeds may look a little unusual to you if you don't have a lot of experience with seeds and collecting seeds from various plants. The seeds are black and paper-like and almost flat except for the embryo in the center of the seed.

If you place an Amaryllis seed between your thumb and index finger you'll be able to tell which are the viable Amaryllis seeds because there will be a pronounced "bump" in the middle of the otherwise flat seed. Any seeds that you can't feel the embryo in failed and are just chaff and can be tossed out because nothing will sprout from them. The seeds that have the embryo should be planted soon after you've collected them.

27 comments:

  1. Thats really helpful for me, because i have quite a few amaryllis seeds, and i don't want to waste my time on the ones that wont grow :)

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  2. Good luck with your Amaryllis seeds Luke.

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  3. I've been blooming/re-blooming all sorts of amaryllis bulbs for a couple of years now, but this is the first time one of them has ever produced seed pods. I never even knew amaryllis produced seeds!!! I just figured they multiplied by creating more bulbs that you could find attached to the mother bulb. Go figure.

    Anyway, I'm amazed, to say the least. I've no idea what to do with them now though..I mean, I'm assuming them take years and years to produce a flowering bulb from seed?

    Absolute Bonus: out of ALL my amaryllis, the one that produced the seed pods has always been my absolute favorite. It's the Charisma that I bought from Smith & Hawken. They had the best quality bulbs I was ever able to find :)

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  4. Chiccup,

    Congrats on the pollinating the flower. I agree with your assessment of the Amaryllis bulbs by Smith & Hawken. Yes, they do take a couple of years to bloom from seed. If you look on the top right corner of the blog you'll find the posts on how to sow your Amaryllis seeds.

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  5. ..pity that i've never had the best of luck at growing ANYTHING from seed.

    well, except for beans. those always seemed to grow wherever I dropped them =P

    Here's hoping. :)

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  6. Chiccup,

    Give it a try, it is really pretty easy. You just need a bit of warmth.

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    1. I found this helpful as i also thought they grew bulbs from mother bulb.I have a few pods that opened today and decided to check internet to find out what to do. I have one red one that the flower is very large but the stem is only about 2 inches out of bulb the flower is bigger than my hand. Is this normal for stem to be so short. I will be planting seeds this weekthey came from a white with a small amount of red in them.

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  7. Agree. Sad to see Smith & Hawkins go under, they had some top notch bulbs. Try Royal Colors or Amaryllis Bulb Company, they both have top quality and excellent variety if looking for new stock.

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  8. c.m.mitchell1,

    Thanks for the tip. Although, the other day I was reading that Target just bought S&H and maybe the bulbs will make a return.

    *crossing fingers*

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  9. love your site , I bought and amaryllis kit at the supermarket (Minerva ) and i am in love with the plant once it flowers i will attend to pollinated. hopefully i get seeds and can grow my little army :) very new to this but fascinated.

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  10. Hi Vampiro,

    Glad you got yourself a bulb kit. Hope your pollination attempts are successful.

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  11. My Minerva had 5 Blossoms the first 3 where Nice and Big, I pollinated these 3 about 2 days after the blossom, and got 3 nice swollen pots which am not waiting for them to rip to collect the seeds, the last 2 flowers where not as big and i also pollinated them but they witter away too quick and dint took the pollen :) but i have 3 that did so am happy lol , i saved some pollen when my red lion flowers i will try to hybridized with the Minerva pollen we will see is all very exiting .

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  12. Vampiro,

    Congrats on the successful pollination.

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  13. So i have my seeds i cant plant all of them how can i save some for later date and or share with friends?

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  14. Vampiro,

    Plant them all as soon as possible. They don't last long like a lot of other kinds of seeds. Sow them and then share the seedlings with your friends.

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  15. Hom do you pollinate the double flowers, they dont seem to have the same visable parts.
    I have been cery successful with the single flowers but have had no success with the voubles, Thank you.

    Wm. DeWayne Booker
    licenselobby@gmail.com
    407-432-6470

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  16. WDW,

    With the double it is very hard because sometimes they're fused together or you can't easily see the reproductive parts. But if you pull away the petals you may be able to at least identify the stigma where you place the pollen

    http://www.amaryllisbulbs.org/2007/11/how-to-pollinate-amaryllis-bulbs.html

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  17. Hi, I was wondering if any one had some Hippeastrum seeds that they might like to shareplease

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  18. Hi, I have managed to grow from seeds 3 amarylis plants although I did not polinate the main plant could this have been the bees doing their work. Now I have these little plants what should I do with them should I cut the leaves off for winter or just leave them.

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  19. Liz,

    It was probably bees pollinating your Amaryllis flower. They'll normally start to lose leaves in the fall if you have them outdoors and when that happens you can cut them off.

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  20. I have a blooming double that I cross polinated in 2005, I think. It is similiar to an apple blossom but not exactly the same.
    If I should come up with a totally different blossom is there a market for the bulb? If so, where?
    Thanks,
    PMC

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  21. Your articles have been very helpful to me in learning how to pollinate and collect seeds. Thank you so much!

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  22. I cross-polinated a Red Lion to a white amaryllis (don't remember the name) and seeds are definitely developing! Question: How long does it take for the seeds to mature and the pods to pop? There is also another flower bud forming. Will this grow & blossom while I am waiting for the seeds? I have grown amaryllis for years but have never had one re-bloom.

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    1. you can expect a bloom from seed in about 5 ro 7 years if grown in home settings with time also out in direct sunglight.

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  23. I success fully pollinated three of my grandmothers amaryllis flowers.....when will the seed pod be ready for me to take the seeds? This is a red and white striped flower.....these bulbs are from her garden...probably originated 60 years ago in California.....they are now in a pot in my kitchen in Kansas city.....

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  24. I success fully pollinated three of my grandmothers amaryllis flowers.....when will the seed pod be ready for me to take the seeds? This is a red and white striped flower.....these bulbs are from her garden...probably originated 60 years ago in California.....they are now in a pot in my kitchen in Kansas city.....

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  25. Try using an electric heating pad for under the seed containers. On Low setting it keeps the seeds at just the right temperature

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